Top Producers Prepare For Annual PFAR Panel On June 23

first_imgCommunity News Top Producers Prepare For Annual PFAR Panel On June 23 By ANDY VITALICIO Published on Thursday, June 10, 2021 | 3:14 pm Herbeauty15 Beauty Secrets Only Indian Women KnowHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyStop Eating Read Meat (Before It’s Too Late)HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty’First Daughters’: From Cute Little Kids To Beautiful Young WomenHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou Can’t Go Past Our Healthy Quick RecipesHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWeird Types Of Massage Not Everyone Dares To TryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeauty CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Subscribe Community News Business News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  More Cool Stuff Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week center_img 7 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Make a comment Community News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Donald CommunityPCC- COMMUNITYVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Top of the News Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS The Pasadena Foothills Association of Realtors (PFAR) has announced the panelists for their annual Top Producer Panel from 4 to 5 p.m. Wednesday, June 23.This year’s theme is “Keeping Up with the Momentum.”The organization said the panelists for 2021 are Carla Buigues and Joan Lamond of The Agency, and Jamie Bridgers of the Teresa Fuller Real Estate Team at Compass.Nick Frias of Coldwell Banker Realty and Kay Tolentino, from TradeMark Real Estate, Inc., will be moderating the panel.“We are ecstatic to have a diverse group of panelists, all of whom are tremendous examples in both their professional and community achievements,” said Barry Storch, PFAR president for 2021.The annual event features top-producing real estate talent in Pasadena and surrounding areas. During the event, the panelists will talk about their recent projects and how they were successful. They are also expected to share the secrets of staying on top of one of the most competitive fields in business.The panelists will also discuss what challenges lay ahead for the real estate industry.For registration details, visit www.pfar.org/event/top-producer-2021.For more information, call PFAR at (626) 795-2455 or email [email protected] was founded in 1907 as the Pasadena Realty Board and incorporated in 1922 with the purpose of promoting good fellowship and fair dealing within the industry.In 1997, the Pasadena-Foothills Association of REALTORS was formed as a result of mergers among three boards — Pasadena, San Marino-South Pasadena and the Foothills, comprised of La Canada Flintridge, La Crescenta and Sunland-Tujunga.To learn more about the organization, visit www.pfar.org.last_img read more

Holiday Exercise

first_imgThe holiday season can be a challenging time for those who are trying to live a healthier lifestyle.From office parties to classic family get-togethers, it seems every event brings an endless array of delicious home-cooked dishes. It’s easy to see why so many Americans relinquish their commitments to eat smarter around the holidays. One of the best ways to fight off holiday meal regret is by exercising on a regular basis, said Alison Berg, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension nutrition and health specialist.“It’s much harder to lose weight than it is to prevent weight gain,” she said.Making time for physical activity is often easier said than done. With lower temperatures and decreased daylight hours, the temptation to skip out on a good daily exercise session is tougher than ever.Try avoiding the regret later by applying these recommended tips from UGA Extension today:Work smarter, not harder. Don’t wait until the new year to set new goals for living healthier.The No. 1 obstacle to regular exercise for many people is time.“People have really hectic schedules, or they’re often going to visit family and friends, and exercise just isn’t at the top of their priority list,” Berg said.If setting aside a full hour for exercise just doesn’t sound possible for you, try finding regular points in the day and use those breaks to get in a quick 10 or 15 minutes of activity. “Just doing a little bit can really help you not have as much to get rid of at the end of the holiday season,” Berg said. “Try to get additional physical activity when you’re on the go. If you can’t make a meaningful exercise session, try to make sure you’re getting in some extra steps.”Berg suggests small measures, like taking the stairs instead of the elevator. “If you go to one of those big-box retailers or a department store to do some shopping, before you get your cart or pick up your first item, do a lap around the perimeter of the store just to get those extra steps in before you start shopping,” she said.Know your resources. For some people, getting to the gym for a daily workout can be too stressful or intimidating.For others, hefty membership fees and the time spent getting to the nearest gym make it unattainable.If that sounds like you, consider building a workout plan that can be done completely within the comfort of your home.Many people mistakenly believe that exercising at home requires the purchase of bulky, often expensive, equipment, but that’s not necessarily the case.“There are lots of apps now that can give you little 10-minute bursts of something you can do with your own body weight, or even just a quick cardiovascular workout that doesn’t require any equipment,” Berg said.Don’t go it alone. Research has shown that having someone to hold you accountable for a goal will greatly increase your chances of success.If you’re going to give at-home workouts a try, consider finding a family member or friend to hold you accountable for your progress.If that doesn’t work, try finding an online trainer through one of the many apps available to download at little to no cost. You can also use the sharing function of these apps to share your progress on social media sites or in closed social media groups specific to that app to get virtual social support.Another creative suggestion Berg offered is making better use of the holiday time you spend with people you typically don’t see.Rather than sitting around in someone’s home to talk, try going on a walk together to catch up on life.Avoid getting too “wrapped up.” If you decide to brave the weather to get in some physical activity, make sure your clothing choices don’t send you heading back home to change.Be sure that your head, hands, and feet stay extra warm and covered. Rather than donning your thickest, warmest coat, try multiple thin layers of clothing that are easier to move in or remove if you start to get too warm.Develop a healthy reward system. The greatest reward you can get from regular exercise is the benefit of living a healthier lifestyle, but if that’s not enough for you, consider adding another incentive.Whether it’s a fun holiday activity on your next day off or just an extra serving of your grandma’s sweet potato casserole, make sure you maintain a good balance in choosing your reward.There’s certainly no shortage of treats around the holiday season, but you can avoid the regret of overindulgence if you have a clear system in place to help you gauge what your hard work has earned you.Ellen Hallman is a student in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences.last_img read more

UK roundup: Hackney Pension Fund, Pensions Regulator, Willis Towers Watson

first_imgHe said: “There is also a threat to our pension fund in that investments in fossil fuel assets become stranded, which means that they’ll lose their value as a result of necessary world-wide action against climate change.”Hackney was the first London borough to set itself a clear risk reduction target within a realistic amount of time in order to make the necessary changes with the minimum of risk, he said.But Chapman cautioned that the council had to make sure any changes to how the pension fund was managed were made extremely carefully. “Our first responsibility is towards those whose pensions we manage as well as other stakeholders, which include local council taxpayers,” he said.In other news, the Pensions Regulator (TPR) reported that membership of defined contribution (DC) schemes had overtaken that of defined benefit (DB) schemes for the first time.In its latest annual DC Trust report, TPR said there were now around 14.8m memberships of DC schemes, compared to 11.7m DB arrangements.Andrew Warwick-Thompson, executive director for regulatory policy at TPR, said: “We have now passed a significant point in UK private sector pensions provision with 55% of all private sector pension scheme members and 85% of active members being participants in DC schemes.”This big change was directly due to the success of the automatic enrolment system (AE) introduced in the last few years, he said, which had seen more than 7m workers join a pension scheme for the first time.“Master trusts have played a major role in the success of AE and so the introduction of a mandatory authorisation and supervision regime via the Pension Schemes Bill is vital,” Warwick-Thompson said.The regulator now needed to make sure there there was “a level playing field” for the protection of consumers investing in contract-based and trust-based multi-employer pension plans, he said, adding that it was clear market forces alone would not have made this happen.Meanwhile, DB pension funds looking to offload liabilities to bulk annuity providers may find lower prices this year due to greater insurance capacity, according to a new report.But they face continued competition from insurance companies seeking to offload risk, Willis Towers Watson said in its 2017 de-risking sector report.Last year was relatively quiet compared to 2015 in terms of pension schemes passing longevity risk to insurers. However, several insurers passed on back books of annuity business to other insurers and reinsurers, such as Aegon’s sale of its £9bn annuity portfolio to Legal & General and Rothesay Life.Ian Aley, head of transactions at Willis Towers Watson, said: “It is not just pension schemes that are competing in the longevity risk market, and the market as a whole has been as busy as ever, if not busier in some cases.“Looking forward there may be continued competition from back-books, with rumours that Prudential has recently started the sales process for its £45 billion pension liabilities operation, including its annuity business.”However, one of the report’s authors, Sadie Scaife, said that the longevity risk market would give “well-prepared buyers” access to attractive pricing terms.Pension schemes offloading liabilities this year were now likely to find cheaper deals, she suggested, as much of the insurance sector’s risk reduction was complete.“The longevity hedging aspect of this activity was largely completed by the end of 2016 and we therefore expect pension schemes carrying out transactions in 2017 to benefit from an excess of supply and consequent lower costs,” she wrote in the report.But this trend was not sustainable in the long term, Scaife warned, because of the size of UK defined benefit (DB) pension liabilities and the rate at which they are maturing, she said.“A recent survey of our clients showed that 50% expect to reach their end-game target in the next ten years,” she said. “Regardless of whether this is in the form of self-sufficiency or buyout, longevity risk protection may well be needed.” The London borough of Hackney has committed its £1.1bn (€1.3bn) pension fund to becoming free of fossil-fuel investments in the long term.The move starts with a six-year plan to cut the fund’s exposure to the carbon-producing assets by 50%, the council announced today.The council said: “This radical move follows a review which looked at the financial risks posed to the pension fund’s fossil fuel investments in light of the Paris Agreement, a global action plan to help limit global warming.”The pensions committee chair, Councillor Robert Chapman, described climate change as “probably the greatest threat facing humankind”.last_img read more