Photo: Jim Harbaugh Was Photobombed By Larry The Cable Guy While Taking Picture With Kenny G

first_imgMichigan Wolverines head coach Jim Harbaugh shouts towards an official during the first quarter of the game against the Penn State Nittany Lions.Jim Harbaugh keeps incredible eclectic company. After hosting a wide-range of athletes and celebrities like Derek Jeter, Migos, and Jim Leyland at Michigan’s massive National Signing Day Event, the Michigan head coach has spent time with Willie Mays and Justin Timberlake. A few of those groupings are strange, but nothing tops being photobombed by comedian Larry The Cable Guy while taking a picture with saxophonist Kenny G during an event at Pebble Beach.Hell ya that’s @officialkennyg and @GitRDoneLarry pic.twitter.com/T9ormn42RD— Coach Harbaugh (@CoachJim4UM) February 13, 2016Bill Murray and Toby Keith were also around.Pebble Beach is how you think it is, Awesome! @GitRDoneLarry @TobyKeithMusic pic.twitter.com/UoOCuoC0Kg— Coach Harbaugh (@CoachJim4UM) February 13, 2016Harbaugh lives a pretty interesting life in the off-season.[SB Nation]last_img read more

Disabled groups fight immigration law they say is demeaning

first_imgTORONTO – A national advocacy group is pushing for the government to repeal immigration criteria that it calls discriminatory toward people with disabilities.The Council of Canadians with Disabilities is calling for the repeal of a provision that bars immigrants with disabilities from settling in Canada on grounds that they could place too much demand on the country’s medical system. The group contends the practice is discriminatory and based on outdated, stereotypical ideas around disability.The council wants the government to drop the requirement from the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and to make sure disabled people are included in crafting a new, more inclusive procedure.The council will be among several groups speaking this week before the House of Commons Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration.The committee is studying the country’s current criteria for the medical admissibility of prospective newcomers and will be holding sessions this week to hear views on the issue.Council First Vice-Chair John Rae says disability rights advocates don’t often get a seat at the table at the inception of a new policy, and the result often is that changes must be made later to address their uniquely complex needs.He hopes hearing a disabled perspective on medical inadmissibility criteria will help the committee shape new rules that are more in line with Canadian values.“In addition to being discriminatory in effect and impact, it is very demeaning because it assumes that persons with disabilities are inherently a burden on society,” Rae said of the current system. “We reject that idea.”The council plans to focus its feedback on a provision of the Act that explicitly singles out disabled applicants and places limits on their prospects of Canadian residency.Section 38-1C states that a person can’t be admitted to Canada if they have a health condition that “might reasonably be expected to cause excessive demand on health or social services.”Rae said that provision is based on an antiquated way of thinking of disability, which assumes that the condition a person has is directly responsible for any issues they may encounter.He said modern approaches to disability focus on a social model, which states difficulties disabled people contend with are more directly related to societal barriers caused by everything from inaccessible physical environments to non-inclusive legislation.He said Canada’s current laws also run counter to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Disabilities, which the government has signed on to.Article 18 affirms disabled people’s right to “liberty of movement, to freedom to choose their residence and to a nationality, on an equal basis with others,” principles Rae said the current system openly violates.Felipe Montoya, whose family ran afoul of the present rules in 2016, said change is long overdue.The York University professor originally from Costa Rica had to temporarily leave Canada when the government found that his 14-year-old son was not eligible for permanent residency because he has Down syndrome and might place an extra burden on the health system.Lawyers have previously said that in such cases, a finding of inadmissibility is often applied to the entire family.The ruling was ultimately overturned after a ministerial intervention, but Montoya said the current Act is unjust and risks shortchanging the country on both ethical and economic grounds.“It reduces the whole family to something one member is considered to lack,” he said. “It doesn’t at any point consider what the disabled person contributes, nor does it consider what the whole family contributes in taxes, in productivity, what they bring to the country.”Montoya is also planning to appear before the committee, which is studying medical inadmissibility criteria at the behest of provincial and territorial immigration ministers.The committee held its first set of hearings on the issue on Oct. 24 and has three more sessions scheduled.The federal government said it was reviewing the law and said every applicant has a chance to “demonstrate their ability and willingness to mitigate any cost impact on social services in Canada.”“No specific health condition results in an automatic rejection of an applicant,” said an emailed response from the government.At the previous meeting of the standing committee, Liberal MP Marwan Tabbara said the policy was in place to “maintain a balance between welcoming new members into society and protecting our publicly funded health care and social services.”Rae said he hopes Section 38-1C of the Act will ultimately be scrapped and called on the committee to ensure disabled groups have a say in any new law created to take its place.“We believe we need to be more involved in the design, development and implementation of any program that affects us,” he said. “Not at the end of the road when the decisions are almost finalized, but at the beginning when there’s still time to positively impact upon what is being developed.”—Follow @mich_mcq on Twitter.last_img read more

Is The Home Run Back Will The Shift Ever Die And 8

Did the Cubs prove tanking works?In many ways, the 2016 Chicago Cubs were an inimitable team. They started with one of the most hyped rosters in MLB history, somehow surpassed even those lofty expectations for most of the regular season, then survived a treacherous postseason to win the World Series and finally set down a burden they’d carried for 108 years. For better and for worse, that’s not a path most franchises are in a position to take.But it won’t stop other clubs from trying to replicate elements of the Cubs’ success. And one major area where they might try to borrow from Chicago’s blueprint is in the reinvigorated notion of the “success cycle.” Longtime friend-of-FiveThirtyEight Jonah Keri introduced the concept in the early 2000s as a way to formalize the idea that teams undergo a cycle of rising and falling, building and tearing down rosters at regular intervals. Keri later disavowed the idea, but it might be on the way back after the Cubs’ rebuilding (or, as the less charitable among us might call it, “tanking”) effort under GM Theo Epstein bore such delicious fruit the past few seasons.At the same time that Epstein was executing his rebuild in Chicago, the Houston Astros were doing something similar (to good effect, with even more success potentially on the way), and the Brewers, Braves and Phillies are currently letting their fields lie fallow. League-wide, just two key characteristics — a team’s payroll and its average age1Weighted by batters’ plate appearances and pitchers’ total batters faced. — explained a whopping 58 percent of the variation in win-loss records during the 2016 season, the highest that mark has been since at least 1998.2When the 30-team era began. Both of those characteristics are strongly associated with how a team tries to manipulate where it is in the success cycleIt’s hard to blame Keri for writing off the success cycle; when he was re-evaluating it after the 2010 season, age and payroll had just gotten done explaining a mere 14 percent of the variation in records. In other words, as recently as a few years ago, the familiar patterns of team-building seemed to have been broken. But in an odd twist, maybe the relevance of the success cycle follows its own cyclical pattern. If that’s the case, the Cubs capitalized on it at exactly the right time. –Neil For a long while, MLB was slouching toward mediocrity — or at least uniformity. In 2014, 23 of the 30 MLB teams won between 70 and 90 ballgames, a relatively narrow range differentiated only by an extra win every 9 days or so. Things got even more compressed in 2015, when a third of the league squeezed itself between 76 and 84 wins, which is far more teams around .500 than usual and indicative of a broader trend in baseball: The spread between the best and worst teams had shrunk rapidly, hitting its lowest level in decades. We can illustrate this by tracking changes in the standard deviation of wins (and wins above replacement) over time — essentially measuring how compressed the range of talent across the game has been.This trend had a number of consequences, including making the sport less predictable and allowing luck to play a larger role in the outcome of the season.But 2016 was the year baseball may have begun to swing back in the opposite direction. Last year, far fewer teams were stuck in that middle range of wins compared to the previous two seasons. More clubs were either clearly good or clearly bad — as symbolized by the symmetry of a league-best 103 wins for the Chicago Cubs and league-worst 103 losses for the Minnesota Twins.Moreover, the correlation between payroll and wins (or WAR) in 2016 was easily the highest it had been for MLB since the late 1990s. Back then, the relationship between money and wins triggered a moral panic of sorts in the commissioner’s office,3With the obvious ulterior motive being to reel in payrolls across the entire sport. so it remains to be seen whether a similar crisis will emerge again 20 years later. But last season’s strong correlation — in conjunction with 2017’s unusually top-heavy projected standings — suggests that teams are getting more of what they’re paying for now than they have in a while, and we’re probably due for less parity as a result. –Neil Will the shift keep getting more popular?Baseball’s swift adoption of the defensive shift stands as one of sabermetrics’ shining achievements, turning what was a seldom-used tactic in the early 2000s into a strategy that was deployed on nearly a third of all balls in play in 2016: But that trend was not to last. The WAR-weighted age ticked upward in 2016, caused in part by the aging of that young cohort. It still remained the second-lowest figure in 30 years, but the abrupt increase suggests that rather than a general youth movement, baseball may have experienced a one-time spike in young talent, one that may lead to a golden generation.The next couple of seasons should provide some clarity. If another class of rookies starts accomplishing amazing things, then perhaps baseball has made a long-term shift toward younger players. In contrast, if Bryant, Lindor, et al. remain dominant, then maybe 2015 was a unique event, the arrival of a new wave of great players who will drag the production-weighted average age up as they get older. Either way, baseball fans are witnessing a major shift in the game’s talent. –RobIs the bullpen takeover here to stay?Postseason fads — which often replicate whatever novel development some team rides to the World Series — are usually quickly dropped in subsequent seasons. (Remember when we thought MLB would be overrun by a horde of speedy, contact-hitting Kansas City Royals clones two Octobers ago?) But last fall’s bullpen craze might be a rare playoff trend with staying power. That’s because the Cubs and Indians’ dominance in relief was just the most visible manifestation of a pattern that’s been building for years.Over the past couple decades, bullpens have become central to teams’ plans. Relievers pitched 33 percent of available innings in 1997; that number reached an all-time high of 37 percent in 2016. More importantly, relievers also generated 24 percent of all pitching wins above replacement (WAR) last season, the most they’ve ever contributed. The latter number has been growing fast in recent seasons, up from just 16 percent as recently as 2005: Are the kids still all right?Kris Bryant burst into baseball in 2015, performing like an All-Star right out of the gate and earning Rookie of the Year honors at age 24. He improved in 2016, elevating his on-base percentage and isolated power on the way to being crowned the National League’s Most Valuable Player (not to mention leading the Cubs to their first World Series title in 108 years).Bryant was emblematic of a larger trend in baseball: the rise of a new generation of talent. Driven by Bryant, Carlos Correa, Francisco Lindor, and a host of other exciting rookies, 2015 featured the lowest average age (weighted by production, as measured by FanGraphs’ wins above replacement) in more than three decades. Will rule changes really speed up the game?MLB unveiled some controversial rules changes this offseason, primarily targeted at speeding up the pace of the game. A couple of new wrinkles concern replays: managers will have only 30 seconds to decide whether to call for a replay, and reviews will be capped at two minutes. The most significant alteration eliminates the ritual of the intentional walk, requiring only a hand signal to send the batter off to first base.The impact of this rule change will be minor because intentional walks are already uncommon and becoming more so. The same goes for the new replay rules, which might shorten a handful of interminable delays per season, but won’t affect most umpire reviews, which don’t last long enough to run into the new restrictions.The real objective in these changes is Rob Manfred’s crusade since becoming commissioner: to speed up the pace of game. But if that’s the goal, Manfred is focused on the wrong things. Since 2008, most of the slowdown has come from players taking their sweet time between pitches, not uncommon events like replays and intentional walks. To truly pick up the pace of play, the commissioner will likely need to deploy an even more radical solution, like adding a pitch clock. But doing so would require the cooperation of the players’ union, which doesn’t want to disrupt the current pace. As a result, Manfred will likely have to chew on the edges without ever solving the underlying problem. –Rob The shift’s popularity has exploded since 2011, with each subsequent season setting new records for how frequently it was used. But given all of this shifting, it’s fair to wonder when the tactic will reach its peak — when hitters will have adjusted enough to keep the defense honest by, say, going to the opposite field, or hitting more fly balls, or even dropping down bunts.We probably aren’t there yet. Even though the league’s batting average on balls in play (BABIP) has stayed relatively constant despite the ridiculous uptick in shifting, there’s also evidence that the shift has hampered the production of the players who face it the most. Then again, Cubs manager — and former shift-master — Joe Maddon used the tactic less than anybody else last season, instead employing a pitching staff who induced unusually soft contact to allow the league’s lowest BABIP. If the rest of baseball ends up copying the champs, maybe the shift will reach a high-water mark after all. –Neil Just when it seemed like Tommy John surgery was becoming a generation-defining problem, it has almost disappeared. Many of the ace pitchers who lost a year to the ailment have returned in force, including Darvish, who has regained most of his efficacy. Even when pitchers suffer ligament damage, doctors are increasingly prescribing less disruptive treatments than the operating table.In prior eras, when one pitching injury died down, another one appeared. Before Tommy John, there were more severe shoulder injuries, which claimed many a young pitcher’s career. With one problem solved, we could be waiting for another crisis to begin. But let’s take a rare opportunity to be optimistic: we could be entering a new golden era of pitcher health! Back to the pessimism: That notion should frighten MLB’s hitters. If pitchers don’t need to worry about their shoulders or their elbows, they could dominate hitters like never before. –Rob Will the offensive renaissance continue?The long ball is back. In the last two years, offense has spiked from a three-decade low, a surge powered almost entirely by home run rates reminiscent of the Steroid Era. And no one is sure why.There are theories. Some have proposed that players are attempting to hit more fly balls, which are more likely to get over the fence. Others have suggested that players are using more granular data to improve their swings. But most explanations don’t survive scrutiny.In a series of articles, Ben Lindbergh and I developed the theory that a different ball is the source of the offensive spike. If a juiced ball is to blame, then MLB’s offensive explosion ought to continue. And since MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred has made it a priority to increase offense in the league, runs per game may soar even higher. Still, without knowing definitively why offense has spiked, it’s impossible to say whether the trend will continue. –Rob It’s long been known that a pitcher is more effective out of the bullpen than as a starter, so it’s not too surprising that by shifting a greater share of the workload to relievers, managers have gotten more value out of their ’pens. But the gap in effectiveness between the two types of pitchers is also growing at an incredible rate. In 1995, the first season of the post-strike era, relievers and starters posted basically identical fielding independent pitching (FIP) rates. Since 2012, however, the average FIP for relievers (3.79) has been 0.25 points lower than the average for starters (4.04).That quarter of a run quickly begins to add up to wins, especially as relievers are called upon to pitch more and more — and, increasingly, in more important situations. Toss in the fact that there are more hard-throwing relievers than before, as well as more managers like Cleveland’s Terry Francona — who experimented with the kinds of revolutionary bullpen tweaks SABR-heads have been advocating for decades — and we might find ourselves looking back at 2016 not as the year relief pitching peaked, but rather as just another waystation on the road to total bullpen dominance. –NeilCan we finally measure defense?Since the inception of sabermetrics, defense has always stumped the statheads. Without the detailed data — like pitch location and exit velocity — that’s available to measure pitching and hitting, defensive metrics have been unreliable and inaccurate. Adam Eaton was one of the best fielders in baseball in 2016 … and, according to those same metrics, a below-average defender in 2015.But the future of defensive stats looks brighter: MLB’s new Statcast system can measure everything about a defensive play, from the running speed of the fielder to the exact landing point of the ball. Armed with that new data, MLB’s statisticians have crafted impressive new metrics to quantify the difficulty of every outfield catch over the last two seasons, a huge upgrade on the information we had available before. (Kevin Kiermaier, your Gold Gloves appear to be well deserved.)Still, the stats aren’t perfect. They don’t account for the direction the fielder has to run in, which means that they treat running forward the same as backpedaling. They don’t incorporate any information about an outfielders’ throws, so a strong and accurate arm counts for nothing. And they are only available for the outfield. Statcast still has major issues tracking grounders (losing as much as 20 percent of all balls in the dirt), so for now, the much more complex mystery of infield defense remains unsolved.Perhaps the biggest problem with these defensive statistics is that they are not being released in full to the public. While MLB is providing snippets of the data in leaderboards and tweets, the complete data set is being kept under wraps. Front office insiders I’ve spoken to have pointed to issues with the data’s quality and the influence of teams eager to keep their analytics edge as two barriers to the data set’s full release. At a crucial point in Statcast’s development, it’s reasonable to wonder whether the data stream will eventually become fully public (like PITCHf/x) or whether it will remain a tool primarily for the front office (like the NBA’s SportVU camera system). –RobIs the Tommy John era over?Two years ago, we were in the midst of a Tommy John epidemic. Elbow ailments felled major stars like Yu Darvish and laid waste to pitching staffs. But last year, Ben Lindbergh and I noted that Tommy John surgeries had suddenly dropped. And so far this spring — usually the most active time for players to be diagnosed with elbow issues — the scourge of Tommy John has become almost a nonissue. Is pitch framing still worth anything?Pitch framing was once a darling of sabermetrics, a stat and a method by which catchers could prove that they provided more value to their teams than the guys competing for their roster spots. For many of those catchers, all those frames add up to several wins over the course of a season. At least, they used to. Pitch framing might be be losing its value.In recent articles, Fangraphs’ Jeff Sullivan has argued that as more teams have exploited pitch framing, the gap between the best and worst catchers has shrunk. With no absolutely terrible receivers in baseball any more, the average framing skill jumped and the value of being a great framer has declined. Paradoxically, all the attention paid to the significance of pitch framing has made it less significant.In hindsight, the demise of framing seems inevitable. Modern front offices eagerly target undervalued skills until they aren’t undervalued anymore. Once they discovered framing and learned to target or develop the skill, it was only a matter of time before most catchers in baseball became good at it. Rather than being a bonus, pitch framing is now a prerequisite. –Rob Is MLB’s era of parity over?We tend to think parity in sports is a good thing. A more level playing field means a higher chance that any team could win, after all. But there’s a fine line between a league with a healthy competitive balance and one where every team is just plain mediocre. The first days of spring are the perfect time to kick back, relax and get ready for a new MLB season and all the possibilities it might bring. We’ve previewed all six divisions already at FiveThirtyEight, but we still had some deep thoughts about baseball’s Big Questions. That’s why we’ve prepared a guidebook of sorts for what to watch for in 2017, with an eye on where the game is headed. Here are 10 topics we’ll be thinking — and writing — about throughout the season: read more

Ohio State mens soccer beats No 15 Kentucky extends winning streak to

OSU senior midfielder Zach Mason (7) prepares to kick the ball during a game against Penn State on Sept. 20 at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. OSU tied 1-1. Credit: Ed MomotOhio State junior forward Danny Jensen scored a goal in the 56th minute to lead the Ohio State men’s soccer team to a 1-0 shutout victory over No. 15 Kentucky.The Buckeyes extended their winning streak to six games and improved their overall record to 7-4-2, while the Wildcats fell to 7-2-2 on the season.With the win, the Buckeyes tied their team-record winning streak, set during the 1987 and 1999 campaigns.The Scarlet and Gray came out of the gates strong to battle a team that came in with a matching five-game winning streak.The Buckeyes had the first shot of the game in the fourth minute when sophomore forward Marcus McCrary sent in a shot to the near post, but his shot was stopped by Kentucky senior goalkeeper Callum Irving.Senior midfielder Kyle Culbertson had the next good look for the Buckeyes in the 19th minute, but Irving also saved his shot.While the offense was stymied by the Wildcats’ defense, the Scarlet and Gray defense matched the effort throughout the first half, preventing the Wildcats from scoring.In the second half of the game, a few Buckeyes created highlight plays that proved vital to the victory.OSU redshirt senior goalkeeper Chris Froschauer made the biggest save of the game in the 50th minute when he stopped a shot from Kentucky junior midfielder Napo Matsoso. Matsoso gathered a rebound to send in a shot from the near post, but Froschauer came across with the save.Froschauer had three saves of the game, earning his fifth shutout of the year and second in a row.Jensen’s goal came in the second half when headed in a shot toward the back post with assists from Christian Soldat and Culbertson. Jenson’s goal gave him the OSU lead in scoring with nine points (four goals, one assist).Once again, the Scarlet and Gray defense held strong in the final 20 minutes to prevent the Wildcats from putting a point on the board.In addition to ending Kentucky’s five-game winning streak, the Buckeyes handed the Wildcats their first home loss of the season.Overall, shots were 13-4 in favor of Kentucky, while corner shots were 5-3 in favor of OSU.The Buckeyes are next scheduled to return home to resume Big Ten play against Wisconsin at 2 p.m. on Sunday at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. read more

JT Barrett picks up another Big Ten award Buckeye pass defense still

The Buckeyes are scheduled to play the Terrapins on Saturday at noon. OSU redshirt-freshman quarterback J.T. Barrett (16) carries the ball during a game against Kent State Sept. 13. OSU won 66-0.Credit: Mark Batke / Photo editorBefore Ohio State coach Urban Meyer spoke at his weekly Monday press conference, the Big Ten announced that redshirt-freshman quarterback J.T. Barrett had been named the conference’s co-Freshman of the Week.Barrett’s award came after he threw for 330 yards and four touchdowns and gained 409 yards of total offense — the second best output in school history — in the win against Cincinnati on Saturday. Just four games into his career, he has already been named either Big Ten Freshman of the Week or co-Freshman of the Week three times, in addition to one Offensive Player of the Week award.While Meyer addressed Barrett’s development this season, he also took time to talk about the Buckeyes across the board as they come off the 50-28 win against the Bearcats.Meyer said he was “very pleased” with OSU’s offensive performance against Cincinnati.He said Barrett has been a strong “distributor” and the coaching staff is working to give him more responsibilities going forward.The champions on offense were: Senior wide receivers Devin Smith and Evan Spencer, redshirt-sophomore wide receiver Michael Thomas, redshirt-senior running back Rod Smith, Barrett, redshirt-junior tight end Nick Vannett and senior tight end Jeff Heuerman.Offensive players of the game were the entire offensive line and sophomore running back Ezekiel Elliott.The champions on defense were: sophomore defensive lineman Joey Bosa, senior defensive lineman Michael Bennett, junior linebacker Joshua Perry and junior cornerback Armani Reeves.Bosa was the defensive player of the game.Meyer said “the obvious concern is pass game” for his defense. The pass defense gave up 221 yards and three touchdowns to one Cincinnati player on Saturday.Meyer said there is a new “Thursday race” award, given to redshirt-sophomore running back Bri’onte Dunn this week for his work on kick coverage.Meyer said kick coverage will be a challenge against Maryland on Saturday. He called the Terrapin’s kick and punt returners some of the best in the Big Ten.He said he expects a “big time atmosphere” in College Park, Md., for the game.Meyer said the lapses in pass defense against Cincinnati were on the coaching staff as well as player execution.“We had four really bad plays that we have to get corrected,” Meyer said of the Buckeyes’ pass defense.He said the defense still “absolutely” has the potential to be a championship-caliber unit.Meyer said he was “really excited” to see the production OSU got from skill-position players against Cincinnati. The Buckeyes’ offense totaled 710 yards, with more than 300 yards both passing and rushing.The coach said the offensive line is picking up depth and improving four games into the season.He said he considers the OSU offense a “very good one, potentially a great one.”Meyer addressed a potential quarterback controversy next season between Barrett and senior Braxton Miller by saying: “Braxton is our quarterback.”Meyer said OSU had some fun with assistant strength and conditioning coach Anthony Schlegel after his takedown of a fan who rushed the field, but also had a serious conversation with him about potential consequences if something were to have happened to the fan.Meyer said the matchup with Maryland is another “big one” for his pass defense. read more

Mens basketball Ohio State loses commitment of 2018 recruit Torrence Watson

Ohio State lost its only commitment in the class of 2018 Saturday when three-star shooting guard Torrence Watson announced via Twitter that he would be re-opening his recruitment.The Whitfield School product from St. Louis cited a desire not to travel so far from home for school as his chief reason for no longer staying committed to the Buckeyes.pic.twitter.com/qVp9t3B5AQ— Torrence Watson (@TorrenceWatson) August 26, 2017The scouting service 247Sports listed Watson as the 123rd-best prospect in the nation on its composite rankings. The site also ranks him 25th-best at his position and the fourth-best recruit in the state of Missouri.Watson received his scholarship offer from the Buckeyes on June 15 and committed on July 10. He had previously received offers from Iowa State, Tulsa, UNLV, West Virginia, Missouri and Vanderbilt. Butler also offered Watson a scholarship on Nov. 6, 2016, when current-Ohio State coach Chris Holtmann was in charge of the team. read more

Three Cardinals Earn AllAtlantic Region Honors

first_img“It’s a wonderful honor for Emina, Gaby, and Brooklynn to be named to the all-region team,” said head coach Karen Ferguson-Dayes.  “They were all outstanding in their own way this fall and are very deserving.” “Brooklynn had the breakout year we all knew she was capable of having,” said Ferguson-Dayes.  “She is a true goal scorer and found herself scoring big goals in big games for us this year! We are excited for her to build off of this year for her senior year.” Print Friendly Version Ekic was named to the first team after an impressive sophomore campaign where she earned first team All-ACC honors. In the preseason, Ekic was named preseason All-ACC and was on the Hermann Trophy Watch List.  Coming off an injury from last season, she was outstanding in ACC play this season.  Ekic, the 2017 ACC Freshman of the Year, finished the regular season with seven goals and five assists for 19 points. She helped the Cardinals score in five of the last six matches, including two game-winning goals.  She led the team with 47 shots and 22 shots on goal.  Vincent earned second team honors for the first time in her career.  The senior was a starting centerback for the Cardinals all four seasons.  She helped guide Louisville to seven shutouts this season, while dishing out one assist. Vincent also served as team captain the last two seasons and helped guide the Cardinals to their best ACC finish and an NCAA Tournament appearance in her final season. LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Louisville’s Emina Ekic, Gabrielle Vincent and Brooklynn Rivers earned All-Atlantic Region honors by United Soccer Coaches association.  Ekic earned first team honors for the second straight season while Vincent earned second team honors and Rivers earned third team honors.  “Gaby Vincent has been our leader since the day she stepped on campus and it’s wonderful to see her senior year end so positively!” Ferguson-Dayes said.  “She has been our most influential player and anchored a very stingy back for her whole four year career.” “Emina had a spectacular year after suffering a major knee injury her freshman year,” said Ferguson-Dayes.  “She was back to full strength and was dominant for us in midfield. She has outstanding feet, she’s a tremendous dribbler and she can score goals during the run of play or off of set pieces.” Rivers earns her first all-region honors.  The junior was named a third team All-ACC selection. She compiled her best season to date for the Cardinals. She led Louisville in scoring with eight goals and seven assists for 23 points.  She also led the Cardinals with four game-winning goals.  She ranked third on the team with 30 shots and 12 shots on goal.  Story Linkslast_img read more

ASU cosmologist suggests studying moon for alien artifacts

first_img Though some might see it as farfetched, or heaven forbid, lunacy, Davis and Wagner are convinced that it’s worth the small amount of investment such a search would entail. What if, they suggest, close-up photographs of the moon that are already being made available to the masses (from NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter) via the Internet, were to be presented with a request that anyone that would like to participate, study whichever photos they find interesting, looking for anything that appears of unnatural origin, then report back. Interesting “finds” could then be studied by many others, and those that seem promising could be studied further by professionals. It all seems so easy, after all, other group projects are underway, and by most accounts, appear to meet with relative success.Another possibility, the team suggests, is using image or shape recognizing software to scan photos of the moon to help narrow down search areas and to alert humans when it finds something interesting.The idea of putting resources towards searching for the existence of intelligent alien life wouldn’t be new of course, the SETI project exists for that sole purpose. Looking for evidence that we’ve been visited by an extraterrestrial is of course a little different, but in this case, it seems to make sense. After all as Davis and Wagner point out, because the moon is so barren, has no atmosphere and because it is so seldom hit with meteorites, things that go on there are preserved for tens or even millions of years. If any aliens visited the moon during that time span, it should be possible to find traces of their activity, or their equipment, offering proof for the very first time, that there really is someone else out there. New calculations suggest Jupiter’s core may be liquefying (PhysOrg.com) — If you were part of a team sent to explore an unknown planet; and that planet had a natural orbiting moon, wouldn’t it make sense to use that moon as a base camp or remote observation post? Especially if you didn’t want those being observed to know you were there? Professor Paul Davis and research technician Robert Wagner think so, and that’s why they’ve published a paper in Acta Astronautica that suggests we humans begin taking a little closer look at our own moon to see if any alien life forms might have left behind some evidence of their visit. More information: Searching for alien artifacts on the moon, Acta Astronautica, In Press. doi:10.1016/j.actaastro.2011.10.022AbstractThe Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) has a low probability of success, but it would have a high impact if successful. Therefore it makes sense to widen the search as much as possible within the confines of the modest budget and limited resources currently available. To date, SETI has been dominated by the paradigm of seeking deliberately beamed radio messages. However, indirect evidence for extraterrestrial intelligence could come from any incontrovertible signatures of non-human technology. Existing searchable databases from astronomy, biology, earth and planetary sciences all offer low-cost opportunities to seek a footprint of extraterrestrial technology. In this paper we take as a case study one particular new and rapidly-expanding database: the photographic mapping of the Moon’s surface by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) to 0.5 m resolution. Although there is only a tiny probability that alien technology would have left traces on the moon in the form of an artifact or surface modification of lunar features, this location has the virtue of being close, and of preserving traces for an immense duration. Systematic scrutiny of the LRO photographic images is being routinely conducted anyway for planetary science purposes, and this program could readily be expanded and outsourced at little extra cost to accommodate SETI goals, after the fashion of the [email protected] and Galaxy Zoo via The Guardian Moon. Photo courtesy of NASA Explore further © 2011 PhysOrg.com Citation: ASU cosmologist suggests studying moon for alien artifacts (2011, December 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-12-asu-cosmologist-moon-alien-artifacts.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

4yearold beaten up in school parents stage protests

first_imgKolkata: There was trouble at a private school in Durgapur on Thursday after guardians staged a sit-in demonstration demanding suspension of a teacher who had beaten up a four-year-old student.A large contingent of police went to the spot to maintain peace.On Monday, a teacher had beaten up a four-year-old student of Kindergarten I for spending more time in the toilet. After she came back from the toilet, the teacher beat her up with a stick and slapped her repeatedly. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsThe girl bled through the left year. Later, she was taken to a hospital where she was treated. On Tuesday, when the parents of several students met the Principal, she assured a thorough investigation into the matter.On Wednesday, the guardians gathered outside the school and demanded stern action against the teacher. However, the school authorities refused to talk to the guardians.The guardians again gathered outside the school campus on Thursday morning demanding suspension of the teacher. Initially, Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedthe school authorities refused to see them but later they agreed to meet the parents of the affected student. The guardians of other students refused to accept this proposal and later parents of six students went to see the Principal.The Principal told them that the concerned teacher had resigned. Not satisfied with this, the parents continued to demand her suspension. They told the Principal that they would not accept it as it was just an eyewash because she will be inducted to another branch of the school. The parents organised a sit-in demonstration outside the school premises to voice their demand.last_img read more