John Holt Plc (JHLT.ng) HY2013 Interim Report

first_imgJohn Holt Plc (JHLT.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Industrial holding sector has released it’s 2013 interim results for the half year.For more information about John Holt Plc (JHLT.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the John Holt Plc (JHLT.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: John Holt Plc (JHLT.ng)  2013 interim results for the half year.Company ProfileJohn Holt Plc assembles, sells, leases and services power and cooling equipment in Nigeria and has business interests in the energy, infrastructure and construction sectors. The company sells, leases and maintains Holt Star air conditioners for home and industrial use; sells, installs and maintains diesel generators; provides after-sales service and spare parts for its product range; and supplies fire and safety equipment and services. John Holt Plc has business interests in warehousing and inventory management, facility management, property development and the construction of glass reinforced plastic boats. Other business interests include construction and maintenance of power projects, supply of power equipment such as transformers, hybrid generators, gas generators and pre-pad meters, and providing services to the power sector which includes power plant management, energy audits, capacity building, technical training and power system redesigns. John Holt Plc is involved in designing and constructing roads, bridges, drainages, residential and industrial buildings, warehouses, shoreline protection facilities, jetties and telecommunications masts. The company also provides professional services for the exploration and production sectors and oil and gas sectors. John Hold Plc is a subsidiary of John Hold & Company (Liverpool) Limited. Its head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. John Holt Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Farm God’s way, reduce food insecurity, says Kenya agriculturalist

first_img Submit a Job Listing Rector Knoxville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Tags Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Africa, Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Press Release Rector Hopkinsville, KY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA By Bellah ZuluPosted Apr 1, 2013 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Bath, NC Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Tampa, FL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Collierville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ [Anglican Communion News Service] An agriculturalist in the Anglican Church of Kenya (ACK) has encouraged farmers in Africa to adopt a biblically-based version of conservation agriculture known as “Farming God’s Way,” to curb food insecurity on the continent.Stephen Gaturu, a project officer in charge of food security in one of the Regional Development Services in ACK, praised the technique. “It has helped farmers in Kenya because it involves farming using resources like compost and mulch which are cheap to get and improve their farms,” he said.The system that uses scientifically sound, no-till agricultural techniques combined with strong biblical teachings to “radically transform farming practices and bring hope to farmers” was originally developed in Zimbabwe.“The Anglican Church (in Kenya) decided to use this technology because land has been plowed for many centuries which has proven to be destructive, uneconomical and environmentally degrading,” he explained. “Plowing also causes soil erosion with our soils ending in rivers, catchments and oceans hence the need to apply mulching which is God’s blanket.”Gaturu revealed that the government of Kenya has also been promoting this kind of farming under the name Conservation Agriculture. “It is similar to the method adopted by the church except that the government’s method involves the use of chemicals to control weeds which can be expensive for many farmers,” he said.“One very big farm in the Kenyan semi-arid region of Laikipia has adopted this method and has been planting wheat in thousands of acres and the yields are very good,” said the agriculturalist. “This is in contrast to their neighbors who are harvesting nothing and are always relying on relief food.”Gaturu said that he developed an interest in the technique after attended a training two years ago.“I introduced it to the community and fellow Christians but it was not easy to convince my community to discard the farming techniques that they have been using for a long time,” he said. “However, I encouraged them to start very small gardens using this technology. The results were tremendous and they can now comfortably plant using this technology.”Although only a small percentage of Kenya’s total land area has sufficient fertility and rainfall to be farmed, agriculture continues to dominate Kenya’s economy. Agriculture is also the largest contributor to Kenya’s gross domestic product (GDP). Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Events Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Anglican Communion Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Farm God’s way, reduce food insecurity, says Kenya agriculturalist Rector Shreveport, LAlast_img read more

A summary of Executive Council resolutions

first_img Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Tampa, FL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Executive Council October 2017 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY center_img Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Collierville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS [Episcopal News Service – Linthicum Heights, Maryland] During its Feb. 5-8 meeting here the Episcopal Church’s Executive Council adopted multiple resolutions, which are summarized below.Advocacy and Networking for MissionAffirm the following ministries as Jubilee Ministries: St. Michael’s Community Services, Inc.; Anniston, Alabama, Diocese of Alabama; St. Andrew’s Hands and Feet Ministry, McKinney, Texas, Diocese of Dallas; The Sutton Scholars High School Enrichment Program, Baltimore, Maryland, Diocese of Maryland; Grace Episcopal Church Ministries, Haddonfield, New Jersey, Diocese of New Jersey; Holy Cross Episcopal Church, Poplar Bluff, Missouri, Diocese of Missouri; St. Barnabas Outreach Ministries, Villas, New Jersey, Diocese of New Jersey; El Buen Pastor Community Services Center, Durham, North Carolina, Diocese of North Carolina; St. Francis Episcopal Church, Dunellen, New Jersey, Diocese of New Jersey (AN021).Approve an Advocacy and Networking initiative to facilitate dialogue and conversation among southeastern U. S. Episcopal institutions of higher learning (AN022).Continue to support action and leadership of the Standing Rock Sioux Nation as the “salt and light of the nation in its unwavering support of the sacredness of water, land, and other resources and reminding us all of the sacred calling to faithfulness;” acknowledge participation of Episcopal Church and its ecumenical partners in the water protection actions led by Standing Rock Sioux Nation, especially the leadership of the Rev. John Floberg and the hundreds of Episcopal laity and clergy who responded to his call for support; affirm and endorse the call of the Standing Rock Sioux Nation’s leadership to a march on Washington on March 10 to proclaim “continuing concern for our sacred waters and lands as well as challenging our government to fulfill all relevant treaty obligations of the United States to all federally recognized tribes.” (AN023)Finances for MissionEstablishes Trust Fund 1148, The Cameron Trust Fund of The Archives of the Episcopal Church (FFM055).Establishes Trust Fund 1149, The Friends of The Archives of the Episcopal Church Trust Fund (FFM056).Designate as a tax-deductible housing allowance for 2017 those allowances requested and presented by four clergy employees of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society (FFM057).Establish Trust Fund 1139, The Gardens of All Saints Endowment Fund, for All Saints Episcopal Church in Concord, North Carolina (FFM058).Establish Trust Fund 1140, Saint Andrew’s Episcopal Church, as investment account for Saint Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Lake Worth, Florida (FFM059).Establish Trust Fund 1141, St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church Belvedere, as investment account for St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, Belvedere, California (FFM060).Establish Trust Fund 1142, Grace Church Endowment, as investment account for Grace Church in Providence, Rhode Island (FFM061).Establish Trust Fund 1143, All Saints Episcopal Church, investment account for All Saints Episcopal Church in San Leandro, California (FFM062).Establish Trust Fund 1144, Saint Augustine of Canterbury Elkhorn Legacy Fund, investment account for St. Augustine of Canterbury Episcopal Church in Elkhorn, Nebraska (FFM063).Establish Trust Fund 1145, Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe, as investment account for The Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe, Paris, France (FFM064).Establish Trust Fund 1146, Episcopal Diocese of California, as investment account for the Episcopal Diocese of California, San Francisco, California (FFM065).Establish Trust Fund 1147, The Edward R. and Julia Lee Cox Williams Fund, for use of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society for care of the aged (FFM066).Accept additional development project i.e. funding for refugee assistance not included in government contracts for Episcopal Migration Ministries, to be an additional focus for fundraising by the development office (FFM067).Governance and Administration for MissionAmend Executive Council and Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society bylaws for clarity and to conform to 78th General Convention canons (GAM008).Receive reports of Provinces II, III, IV, V, VI and IX and forward to the Executive Council for its information (GAM009).Recognize with thanks more than 75 years of refugee resettlement work by Episcopal Migration Ministries, acknowledges that almost 60 General Convention resolutions in the last 40 years have addressed work with and advocacy for refugees, deeply mindful that the Old and New Testaments of the Holy Bible require us to care for the alien and for strangers; request presiding bishop, in consultation with president of the House of Deputies, chief legal officer, Executive Committee of Executive Council, Office of Government Relations and Episcopal Migration Ministries, to investigate whether it is appropriate and advisable for the DFMS to file, or intervene, in litigation in order to defend the refugee resettlement ministry of EMM and to contest the imposition of any religious test upon any refugee, asylum seeker, or other person seeking residence, asylum or lawful entry into the United States, as such tests are contrary to our faith and contrary to a good faith construction of the U.S. Constitution and governing federal law; request presiding bishop report on such investigation, along with any recommendations, to the next regular meeting of Executive Council, or to an earlier meeting of Executive Council or Executive Committee if earlier action is appropriate; regular, detailed reports of any such litigation that may be filed to be regularly and confidentially provided chief legal officer to Executive Council (GAM010).Consent to the Joint Standing Committee on Planning & Arrangement’s selection of Baltimore in the Diocese of Maryland as site for 80th General Convention in 2021 (GAM011).Local Mission and MinistryApprove series of Constable Fund grants for mission initiatives, which were not provided for within the budget of the Episcopal Church General Convention/Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society (DFMS), and which have been recommended by council’s Constable Grant Review Committee and approved by council’s Joint Standing Committee on Local Ministry and Mission (LMM006).Approve the following grants recommended by the D005 Advisory Group on Church Planting and approved for funding by Joint Standing Committee on Local Ministry and Mission (LMM007).World MissionExpress appreciation for appointments made on behalf of the presiding bishop in recent months including the Rev. Karen King, Diocese of Chicago, Episcopal Volunteer in Mission, Msalato Theological College, Diocese of Central Tanganyika, Church of the Province of Tanzania, appointment started on Sept. 8, 2016; the Rev. Walter Roy Knowles, Diocese of Olympia, teaching assignment as Episcopal Volunteer in Mission, Theological Seminary of the Episcopal Church of Haiti, appointment started on Nov. 6; Thomas McGowan, Diocese of Nebraska, Episcopal Volunteer in Mission, Diocese of the Dominican Republic, assignment began on August 1, 2016; Lucinda Mosher, Diocese of Florida, teaching assignment as Episcopal Volunteer in Mission, Theological Seminary of the Episcopal Church of Haiti, appointment started June 18; Perry Alan Yarborough, Dioceses of Western North Carolina and Upper South Carolina, intern with the Episcopal Church Office of Government Relations and Virginia Theological Seminary Center for Anglican Communion Studies, appointment Sept. 1 (WM013).Express appreciation for Young Adult Service Corps appointments made on behalf of the presiding bishop in recent months including Naomi Zoe Cunningham, Diocese of Kansas, American Cathedral, Convocation of Churches in Europe, assignment began Aug. 25, 2015; Adrienne Davis, Diocese of Southern Virginia, Helpers for Domestic Helpers in Hong Kong,  assignment began Aug. 17, 2016; Alexandria Fields, Diocese of Florida, Diocese of Costa Rica, Sept. 19, 2016; Alexa Henault, Diocese of Rhode Island, Diocese of Costa Rica, assignment began Sept. 19, 2016; Tristan Jacob Nicholas Holmberg, Diocese of Kansas, second year extension, Church of the Philippines, initial assignment began Sept. 24, 2015; Mitchell Honan, Diocese of Connecticut, Diocese of Haiti, assignment began July 7, 2016; Zachary Jeffers, Diocese of Upper South Carolina, chaplaincy assistant at the Mission to Seafarers in Hong Kong, assignment began Aug. 17, 2016; Katherine Jewett-Williams, Diocese of Dallas, Diocese of Liverpool, Anglican Church of England, assignment began Sept. 11, 2016; Jourdan Johnson, Diocese of Connecticut, Diocese of South Western Brazil, appointment began Dec. 15, 2016; Jack Karn, Diocese of Vermont, Jerusalem Peacebuilders and St. George’s Boys School in the Diocese of Jerusalem, appointment started Oct. 1, 2016; Emily Kirk, Diocese of East Tennessee, Diocese of Liverpool, assignment began Sept. 11, 2016; Elijah Lewis, Diocese of Upper South Carolina,  CASB Project in Cap-Haitien, Diocese of Haiti, assignment began July 7, 2016; Kellan Lyman, Diocese of Atlanta, Church in the Philippines, assignment began Sept. 12, 2016; Rachel McDaniel, Diocese of West Tennessee, UTO-YASC intern, Diocese of North Dakota; assignment started Sept. 1, 2016; Charles Merchant, Diocese of South Carolina,  Order of the Holy Cross Monastery, Diocese of Grahamstown, Church of the Province of South Africa, departure pending due to visa issues; Wilmot Merchant, Diocese of South Carolina, a Asian Rural Institute, Nippon Sei Ko Kai, appointment began Nov. 13, 2016; Brooklyn Payne, Diocese of Missouri, Diocese of Panama, assignment began Sept. 1, 2016; James Isaac Rose, Diocese of Southwestern Virginia, second year extension, Mission to Seafarers, Nippon Sei Ko Kai, initial assignment started Sept. 7, 2015; Tristan Tucker, Diocese of Springfield,  Church in the Philippines, assignment began Sept. 1, 2016; Bryan Alexis Velez Garcia, Diocese of Puerto Rico, second year extension, Diocese of Rio de Janeiro, Anglican Church of Brazil, initial assignment began Dec. 19, 2015 (WM014).Express appreciation for mission companions who faithfully completed their term of service including the Rev. Honey Becker, Diocese of Hawaii, manager, St. George’s Guest House, Diocese of Jerusalem, Jan. 1, 2012- Aug. 31, 2016; the Rev. Ndungu Ikenye and Rose Ikenye, Diocese of Chicago, director of the Institute of Human Resources and Leadership and professor, St. Paul’s United Theological College, manager, Institute of Human Resources and Leadership respectively, Diocese of Thika, Church of the Province of Kenya, June 1, 2006-Dec. 31, 2016; the Rev. Donnel O’Flynn, Diocese of Central New York, English instructor, Diocese of Haiti, Aug. 1, 2015- Aug. 31, 2016; Heidi Schmidt, Diocese of New York, initially assigned as HIV/AIDS program assistant, Diocese of Grahamstown, Church of the Province of Southern Africa, later as coordination of missionary work, dioceses of the Episcopal Anglican Church of Brazil, Feb. 1, 2005-Dec. 31, 2016;  Monica Vega, Diocese of New York, Diocese of New York, initially assigned as HIV/AIDS program assistant, Diocese of Grahamstown, Church of the Province of Southern Africa, later as coordination of missionary work, dioceses of the Episcopal Anglican Church of Brazil, Feb. 1, 2005-Dec. 31, 2016 (WM015).Express appreciation for Young Adult Service Corps volunteer companions who faithfully completed their term of service including Thomas Balch, Diocese of West Virginia, Diocese of Cape Town, Church of the Province of South Africa, Sept. 29, 2015-Aug. 31, 2016; Catherine Carscadden, Diocese of Virginia, Church of the Philippines, Sept. 24, 2015-Oct. 31, 2016; Mary Grace Benhase, Diocese of Georgia, St. John’s Cathedral, Hong Kong, Aug. 25, 2015-Sept. 30, 2015; Elizabeth Martin (Eliza) Brinkley, Diocese of North Carolina, CASB Project in Cap-Haitien, Diocese of Haiti, Sept. 15, 2015-Aug. 31, 2016; Andrew James Cameron, Diocese of Virginia, St. John’s Cathedral, Hong Kong, Aug. 25, 2015-July 31, 2016; James David Fitzpatrick, Diocese of Hawaii, Diocese of Panama, Sept. 14, 2015-Oct. 31, 2016;  Alejandra Garcia-Gonzalez, Diocese of Delaware, Diocese of Costa Rica, Aug. 27, 2015-April 30, 2016; Charles Graves, Diocese of Southern Ohio, St. Paul’s Within the Walls, Rome, Italy, Convocation of Churches in Europe, Sept. 15, 2015-Sept. 30, 2016; James Anthony Guandique, Diocese of Los Angeles, Fundación Cristosal, Diocese of El Salvador, Oct. 10, 2015-Nov. 30, 2016; Timothy Gardner Hamlin, Diocese of New York, Mariya uMama weThemba Monastery, Order of the Holy Cross, Diocese of Grahamstown, Church of the Province of South Africa, Sept. 21, 2015-Aug. 31, 2016; Annie Marie Jacob, Diocese of Virginia, Diocese of Liverpool, England, Nov. 6, 2015-July 31, 2016; Kayla Massey, Diocese of Upper South Carolina, Diocese of Santiago, Episcopal Church in the Philippines, later as a UTO-YASC Intern at the Episcopal Church Center, Aug. 14, 2014-Sept. 30, 2016; Jacob Ryan Nastruz, Diocese of Iowa, Diocese of Johannesburg, Church of the Province of Southern Africa, Oct. 15, 2015-Aug. 31, 2016; Lacey Leigh Oliver, Diocese of Tennessee, HOPE Africa, Diocese of Cape Town, Church of the Province of Southern Africa, Sept. 23, 2015-Aug. 31, 2016; Eric Matthew Panter, Diocese of Texas, Church of the Philippines, Sept. 24, 2015- Oct. 31, 2016; Andrew Stevenson Russell, Diocese of Virginia and Diocese of Southern Virginia,  Carpenters Kids, Diocese of Central Tanganyika, Church of the Province of Tanzania, Aug. 27, 2015-Aug. 31, 2016; Paola Andrea Sanchez Figueroa, Diocese of Puerto Rico, St. Paul’s Within the Walls, Rome, Italy, Convocation of Churches in Europe, Sept. 15, 2015-July 31, 2016; Ellen Sofia Sandin, Diocese of Los Angeles, Diocese of Southern Brazil, Anglican Episcopal Church of Brazil, Jan. 10, 2016-July 31, 2016; Rachel Lynn Schnabel, Diocese of Southwest Florida, Diocese of Brasilia, Anglican Episcopal Church of Brazil, Nov. 21, 2015-Dec. 31, 2016; Katherine Elizabeth Snow, Diocese of Virginia, Diocese of Costa Rica, Aug. 27, 2015-Aug. 31, 2016; Emilie Jeannette Street, Diocese of Mississippi, El Espíritu Santo Bilingual School, Tela, Diocese of Honduras, Aug. 8, 2015-July 31, 2016; Eleanor Grace (Elly) Withers, Diocese of North Carolina, Diocese of Panama, Sept. 8, 2015-Oct. 31, 2016 (WM016).Recognize renewal of companion relationship between Diocese of Chicago and Diocese of Southeast Mexico for an additional five years, unless extended or terminated by mutual consent (WM017).Recognize renewal of companion relationship between Diocese of Chicago and Diocese of Renk (South Sudan) for an additional five years, unless extended or terminated by mutual consent (WM018).Approve the Seminarian Award Grants and Young Adult Grant Awards as proposed by United Thank Offering (WM019).Commend to every Episcopalian for study the 2013 convergence statement published by the World Council of Churches, The Church: Towards a Common Vision; that secretary of Executive Council send a copy of this resolution to all seminaries and theological learning centers in Provinces I-IX, encouraging students and faculty to study and comment on this document; that the secretary send a copy of this resolution to ecumenical officer in the dioceses; that the secretary send a copy of this resolution to the secretary of the House of Bishops, which is encouraged to study and formally respond to this important document; that the secretary be directed to post the text of the statement on the DFMS website with a provision for individuals to post a personal comment (WM020).Express thanks and appreciation to: the Rev. Ellen K. Wondra, Chicago, Illinois; the Rev. Christopher M. Agnew, King George, Virginia; the Rt. Rev. John C. Bauerschmidt, Nashville, Tennessee; Canon Noreen Duncan, Trenton, New Jersey; Richard J. Mammana, New Haven, Connecticut; Elizabeth Ring, Portland, Maine; the Rev. Aida Consuelo Sanchez Navarro, Tegucigalpa, Honduras; the Rt. Rev. Alan Scarfe, Des Moines, Iowa; the Rev. David Simmons, Waukesha, Wisconsin; and Episcopal Church Center staff members the Rev. C.K. Robertson and the Rev. Margaret Rose for their careful, thoughtful work in drafting a proposed response to the 2013 statement issued by the World Council of Churches entitled The Church: Towards a Common Vision, a convergence statement that has been developed over the last thirty years by the World Council of Churches Commission on Faith and Order; and that the title of proposed response be changed to “A Draft of a Proposed Response of the Episcopal Church to The Church: Towards a Common Vision” and then be posted by the Secretary of Executive Council along a copy of this resolution on the DFMS website; acknowledge that the World Council has invited all member churches to respond formally to this significant document; that the secretary of Executive Council be directed to send a copy of this resolution, as well as all resolutions related to this topic, to those listed above (WM021).Acknowledges receipt of proposed draft response from an ad hoc committee of the Episcopal Church to 2013 statement issued by the World Council of Churches entitled The Church: Towards a Common Vision, a convergence statement that has been developed over the last thirty years by the WCC’s Commission on Faith and Order; title to be changed to “A Draft of a Proposed Response of the Episcopal Church to The Church: Towards a Common Vision”; acknowledge that the World Council has invited all member churches to respond formally; council, as the body authorized to act on behalf of the General Convention between its triennial meetings, directs the secretary of Executive Council to submit this proposed, draft response to the Commission on Faith and Order of the World Council of Churches along with a copy of this resolution no later than March 31, 2017, clearly noting in a cover letter that a final and definitive response from the Episcopal Church must await formal and final action by the General Convention of this Church (WM022).Approve amended charter between the Episcopal Church in the Philippines and the Episcopal Church (WM023).Authorize treasurer to provide a grant of up to $500,000 to sustain the ministry of Episcopal Migration Ministries during 2017; program funding for 2018 will be considered as necessary; director of EMM, with the assistance of the treasurer, to develop sustainability plan reflecting needs, critical operations and accountability for these funds; plan to be subject to the approval of the chairs of Finances for Mission and World Mission in collaboration with chair and treasurer (WM024). Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Music Morristown, NJ Tags Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Posted Feb 8, 2017 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Executive Council, A summary of Executive Council resolutionslast_img read more

Two new books on a people’s response to COVID-19 ‘Planète Malade’ and ‘Capitalism on a Ventilator’

first_imgFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare this COVID-19 is an evolving catastrophe for the world’s working class. You may think you have read all that can be said about the virus and can’t bear to read one more thing – even though you follow it closely every day. So it will surprise you to learn that there is significantly more to read.Two new books are “Planète Malade” and “Capitalism on a Ventilator: The Impact of COVID-19 in China and the U.S.”  Published in French and English, respectively, they include information and analysis that is missing from much of the big business media. They compare how capitalist and socialist countries have responded to the pandemic.While these books come from different political traditions, what is striking is how frequently they agree. “Planète Malade” comes out of the anti-capitalist, socialist movements of Western Europe – France, Germany and Belgium being most prominent.‘Capitalism on a Ventilator’“Capitalism on a Ventilator” is an anthology of writings by more than 50 authors.  They include Vijay Prashad (Tricontinental), Max Blumenthal (Greyzone), Margaret Kimberley (Black Agenda Report), Margaret Flowers (Green Party) and political prisoner Mumia Abu-Jamal. Its editors are Sara Flounders, director of the International Action Center, and Lee Siu Hin, director of the China-US Solidarity Network.Flounders’ introduction begins: “The United States is reeling from a triple crisis: the COVID-19 pandemic that has inflicted over 4.4 million confirmed cases … the most of any country in the world. Beyond this pain, suffering and death, over a million workers a week have filed for unemployment [benefits] ever since April. … [M]illions of people all over the country have marched and protested racism and systematic abuse of police power.”Updating the statistics cited by Flounders, as of Feb. 8 there have now been 27.6 million cases of COVID-19 and 475,000 deaths in the U.S. (Worldometer) Many epidemiologists say even these figures are significant undercounts.Flounders calls out Republican and Democratic politicians in the U.S. for scapegoating China, the first country to identify COVID-19 among its population.  Washington’s blaming China for the pandemic is in line with U.S. imperialism’s confrontational economic and diplomatic policies toward that country.Articles in the “Ventilator” anthology emphasize the need to refute widespread anti-China and anti-Asia rhetoric. The writings discuss the political environment surrounding the pandemic, and examine how greed, hypocrisy, and incompetence fueled by racism have infected the woefully inadequate, horrific U.S. response.Striking articles in the anthology explain how systemic racism in the U.S.  intertwines with the pandemic. Black, Latinx and Indigenous communities have  disproportionately suffered from illness and death. A piece by Abu-Jamal describes this spiraling disaster.Essays explain how China warned the world about the virus even as Wuhan residents first fell ill. It shared scientific data and aided many countries with desperately needed medical supplies. Then Trump and the corporate media viciously blamed China for the pandemic. European governments viewed China’s swift, effective response with disdain.Lee Siu Hin’s article, entitled “Corporate Theft of COVID $$,” describes the Small Business Administration’s COVID-19 Paycheck Protection Program. The loan program was allegedly intended to provide relief to preserve small businesses and their jobs. But the PPP provided “a payout for the rich and connected with only tip money for a small business.”This article lists pages of payouts: to Ivanka Trump’s father-in-law Charles Kushner, to generals, lawyers, billionaires, and big media outlets, to Catholic archdioceses, to businesses owned by Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao’s family and others owned by Paul Pelosi, spouse of  House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, and to a host of other politicians and wealthy individuals. PPP loans, which were mostly to be forgiven, were just another way for the obscenely rich to further profit from the COVID crisis.‘Planète Malade’ Author Michel Collon interviewed over 50 nurses, doctors, scientists, economists, ecologists and reporters from 16 different countries to produce two 400-page volumes, published on Sept. 1, 2020, called “Planète Malade.” Volume two contains more than 40 interviews. (The two volumes have not yet been translated into English.)The book begins by asking two key questions: “With another strategy, would we have been able to save most of Covid’s victims, considerably diminish the general agony and quickly relaunch our economies? Why did some countries succeed while ours didn’t?” In an interview with “Le Drapeau Rouge,” the Belgian Workers Party publication,  Collon makes this point sharply. Europe and the United States have a combined population of around 700 million people and have suffered about 700,000 deaths. Seven countries in East Asia, including China and Vietnam, with a total of 1.52 billion people, have had around 7,000 deaths. Why has there been such a disparity in outcomes?  What is especially striking is that this pandemic first spread in China.Collon interviewed Aziz Salmone Fall, an academic and activist in Montreal. Fall describes a post-colonial Africa where people in many countries suffer from endemic health conditions, including malaria, due to hunger, bad water and impoverishment.For decades, the imperialist International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, seeking to ensure corporate profits, ruthlessly forced African economies into austerity.  This resulted in hollowed-out public health systems and governments unable to offer their people emergency economic support during the pandemic.  Fighting COVID will burden the future, hampering development and even their response to ordinary public health needs.Collon interviewed the eminent French mathematician Laurent Lafforgue on the mathematics of coronavirus replication. His interview appears early in “Planète Malade,” and provides a critical tool to explain why the responses of most countries were doomed to fail, while a few countries were very successful in holding the pandemic at bay.Lafforgue says that if one infected person infects just two other people in a week, by the second week these two people would infect at least two additional people. By the end of the tenth week, at least 1,024 people would be infected from the initial two people. Without quarantining or some method of interrupting the chain of transmission, this progression is inevitable and immutable because this coronavirus is spread through the air.Lafforgue’s explanation is important to grasp. While it is not news to mathematicians and epidemiologists, it was apparently ignored by most political leaders who made, or failed to make, vital policy decisions in response to COVID.Why a rapid response is necessaryThis means in practice that the rapidity with which governments move to control the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, determines the outcome. Several measures can be implemented immediately to interrupt transmission: wearing masks, social distancing, testing and tracing.  But the most  significant variable is how quickly governments act to impose controls to break the chain of human contact and transmission.Once the existence of a dangerous contagious disease was known, government officials who failed to act were derelict in doing their jobs. They needed to act immediately. They should have been able to implement an emergency strategy, but instead did nothing and looked for scapegoats.The delays meant that the number of infections and deaths increased exponentially.  The U.S. and European countries dithered, bickered and pointed fingers. Weeks passed — and the inexorable pandemic described in Lafforgue’s model has exacted a terrible human toll.China on a ‘war footing’But this was not the response everywhere. China took dramatic and ultimately effective global quarantine measures. The government put the country on a war footing to combat the pandemic. Factories ramped up to increase the supply of needed supplies. Scientific labs immediately began to study the virus. Emergency facilities were built in record time.The first COVID-19 outbreak had occurred in Wuhan, Hubei Province’s capital and a major transportation hub. Tens of thousands of health care workers aided the people of Wuhan and Hubei Province. The Chinese government imposed a 76-day lockdown on Wuhan, beginning Jan. 23, 2020, that had essential popular support.  This action successfully interrupted transmission of the virus.There have been 4,636 COVID deaths in China since the pandemic began, mostly in Hubei Province, which has 59 million residents.  France, with over 65 million people, has so far had nearly 79,000 deaths.Other countries in Asia, Oceania and elsewhere immediately took notice of China’s measures. Vietnam, South Korea, the state of Kerala in India, Cuba, Australia and New Zealand moved quickly and decisively, to their considerable benefit.Only weeks after the virus was well-established did European countries and some North American countries reluctantly adopt some of the measures implemented by China early in the pandemic. But for many countries, and certainly for the U.S., it was already too late to get a grip on the galloping spread of the virus. The measures they implemented have been too little, too late, and too intermittent to have a decisive impact.The result is the terrible toll in death and economic dislocation that has occurred in Europe and the U.S., which is by no means over. In the countries that acted quickly and focused on meeting their people’s needs, the ultimate toll has been far less. This follows the mathematical law explained so well in “Planète Malade.” Capitalist countries like New Zealand avoided major fatalities by using a combination of enforced isolation, quarantines, contact tracing and testing, and lockdowns.Socialist countries like China, Vietnam and Cuba, whose governments are not obligated to preserve and protect capitalists’ profits, had no political obstacles and acted rapidly. Beside the public health measures all countries could have adopted, the socialist countries also had significant grassroots organizations that could mobilize popular support to provide aid to mitigate the pandemic’s impacts on people’s lives.How to get the booksBoth books have printed editions. Buying eBooks gets them to readers immediately.“Planète malade” by Michel Collon. Two volumes in one eBook. Available in French only. Tome 1 : L’Enquête (1-431) and Tome 2 : Entretiens (1-395).  Each volume has footnotes, bibliographic resources and an index. Publisher: InvestigAction.net.  $10.99 for eBook. See tinyurl.com/1xh61qgg.“Capitalism on a Ventilator: The Impact of COVID-19 in China and the U.S.”  Edited by Sara Flounders and Lee Siu Hin.  A project of the International Action Center and the China US Solidarity Network. Order paperback for $16 (plus shipping) at  tinyurl.com/CapVent-print or order eBook from Kobo for $12.99 at tinyurl.com/CapVent-ebook.last_img read more

Journalists face archaic sanction of capital punishment in some parts of the world

first_imgSince then, press freedom and human rights organizations have campaigned on many occasions on behalf of numerous journalists and bloggers to prevent the worst. In Mauritania, the blogger Mohamed Cheikh Ould Mohamed Mkhaiti was sentenced to death in 2014 for apostasy. The sentence was confirmed on appeal in 2016 only to be commuted to two years’ imprisonment in 2017. Help by sharing this information In China, which is one of 54 countries that still have the death penalty and holds the record for the largest number of executions, the last journalist executed surprisingly was the Associated Press correspondent Yin-Chih Jao in 1951. However, long prison terms and life sentences imposed on journalists, often in appalling conditions and accompanied by ill-treatment, amount to death sentences in reality. In 2017, the Nobel Peace Prize winner Liu Xiaobo and the blogger Yang Tongyan died as a result of lack of medical care in prison.In Latin America, where most countries have abolished or partially abolished the death penalty over recent decades, no journalists have been sentenced to death for 50 years. However, the direct or indirect participation of governments in extra-judicial executions of journalists by hitmen, mercenaries or crime gangs is a recurring fact in several countries in the region, including Argentina, Chile, Mexico, Brazil and Colombia. RSF_en This latest conviction brings the number of journalists currently on death row to nine. The previous case was in September 2017, when the South Korean journalists Son Hyo-rim and Yang Ji-ho, as well as the publishers of their newspaper Kim Jae-ho and Pang Sang-hun, were condemned to death in absentia “with no right of appeal” for publishing a positive review of a book about North Korea’s growing market economy.  News June 9, 2021 Find out more to go further News Four Yemeni journalists and an Iranian editor are under sentence death and await execution. Reporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns the use of the death penalty, an antiquated form of punishment, to threaten journalists in some parts of the world. Major campaigns in favour of a number of symbolic cases, such as that of the photographer Shawkan in Egypt and the Radio France Internationale correspondent Ahmed Abba in Cameroon’s Far North region, may have helped to pre-empt the judges’ inclination towards the death penalty in these countries. In both cases, as well as those of the journalists Ali Al-Omari in Saudi Arabia and Ali Mohaqiq Nasab in Afghanistan, prosecutors requested the death penalty for blasphemy and terrorism-related offences. Their final sentences, however, did not follow these deadly requests.   “It is difficult to imagine that, in 2020, journalists are still being sentenced to this most archaic and barbaric of penalties,” said RSF Secretary-General Christophe Deloire. “Every year the worldwide abolition of the death penalty moves a little closer and threats to execute journalists because of their work should be consigned to history instead of being news. Governments that favour abolition should join forces to finally make redundant an outdated penalty that is the worst possible obstacle to freedom of the press.”      In Myanmar, the sports journalist Zaw Thet Htwe was sentenced to death in 2004 for sending information to the International Labour Organisation. His sentence was later commuted to three years’ imprisonment by the Supreme Court on appeal.   Iran’s neighbour Iraq is the most recent country to have carried out the death penalty on a journalist. In March 1990, the British journalist Farzad Bazoft was executed on charges of spying for British and Israeli intelligence.   July 6, 2020 Journalists face archaic sanction of capital punishment in some parts of the world Journalists have also been executed by non-state groups. The barbaric decapitations of the American journalists James Foley and Steven Sotloff by the Islamic State group in August 2014 in retaliation for US intervention in Iraq and Syria are seared in people’s memories.In Afghanistan, a dozen local journalists and media workers have been executed by the Taliban since 2001. Among them was the BBC correspondent Abdul Samad Rohani, shot dead in 2008. The journalist Ajmal Naqshbandi and Sayed Agha, who worked as interpreter and driver respectively for Daniele Mastrogiacomo, a journalist with the Italian newspaper La Repubblica both had their throats cut.center_img Iran: Press freedom violations recounted in real time January 2020 The Yemeni journalists Abdul Khaleq Amran, Akram Al-Walidi, Hareth Humaid and Tawfiq Al-Mansouri were found guilty of espionage by a Houthi court in Sanaa and received the maximum sentence in April this year. The Iranian government critic Rouhollah Zam, who ran AmadNews, a website and a channel on the messaging platform Telegram, learned of his sentence in Tehran for “corruption on earth” just one week ago. Follow the news on Middle East – North Africa News WhatsApp blocks accounts of at least seven Gaza Strip journalists Organisation Receive email alerts IranEgyptAfghanistanSouth KoreaNorth KoreaChinaCameroonMauritaniaUnited StatesArgentinaChileColombiaMexicoMiddle East – North Africa Asia – PacificAfricaAmericas Condemning abusesReligious intoleranceProtecting journalistsOnline freedoms Armed conflictsOrganized crimeJihadismImprisonedInternetCitizen-journalistsViolence News RSF joins Middle East and North Africa coalition to combat digital surveillance IranEgyptAfghanistanSouth KoreaNorth KoreaChinaCameroonMauritaniaUnited StatesArgentinaChileColombiaMexicoMiddle East – North Africa Asia – PacificAfricaAmericas Condemning abusesReligious intoleranceProtecting journalistsOnline freedoms Armed conflictsOrganized crimeJihadismImprisonedInternetCitizen-journalistsViolence June 8, 2021 Find out more It is unlikely that these sentences will be carried out, although in Iran, among the countries with the highest number of executions, the death penalty is a sword of Damocles hanging over journalists. In the past 20 years at least 20 journalists, bloggers and citizen-journalists have been sentenced to death.  Iran’s Islamic penal code, based on the Sharia, provides for capital punishment for a variety of offences.  Soheil Arabi, recipient of the 2017 RSF Press Freedom Prize in the citizen journalism category, was sentenced to death in 2014 for “insulting the Prophet of Islam, the Shiite Holy Imams and the Koran”. Adnan Hassanpour, who worked for the Iranian Kurdish-language weekly Asou, was sentenced to death in 2007 for spying. 2000, Hassan Youssefi Echkevari, an Islamic cleric and journalist who worked for the monthly magazine Iran-e-Farda, was tried and sentenced to death for being a “mohareb”, “one who fights God”.  He was accused of subversive activities against national security, defaming the authorities and attacking the prestige of the clergy.All these sentences were commuted in the end to long prison terms, sometimes life, but Iran still holds the dubious record for the number of journalists officially executed in the past 50 years. In the aftermath of the Islamic revolution in 1979, at least 20 journalists close to the shah’s regime, such as Ali Asgar Amirani , Simon Farzami and Nasrollah Arman, and others associated with left-wing circles including Said Soltanpour and  Rahman Hatefi-Monfared were executed by firing squad. June 3, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Global Cell Therapy Market (2020 to 2027) – by Cell Type, Therapy Type, Therapeutic…

first_img TAGS  Pinterest By Digital AIM Web Support – March 23, 2021 Twitter WhatsApp Facebook DUBLIN–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Feb 8, 2021– The “Cell Therapy Market by Cell Type, Therapy Type, Therapeutic Area, and End User: Global Opportunity Analysis and Industry Forecast, 2020-2027” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering. The global cell therapy market accounted for $7,754. 89 million in 2019, and is expected to reach $48,115. 40 million by 2027, registering a CAGR of 25. 6% from 2020 to 2027. Cell therapy involves administration of somatic cell preparations for treatment of diseases or traumatic damages. Cell therapy aims to introduce new, healthy cells into a patient’s body to replace diseased or missing ones. This is attributed to the fact that specialized cells, such as brain cells, are difficult to obtain from human body. In addition, specialized cells typically have a limited ability to multiply, making it difficult to produce sufficient number of cells required for certain cell therapies. Some of these issues can be overcome through the use of stem cells. In addition, cells such as blood and bone marrow cells, mature, immature & solid tissue cells, adult stem cells, and embryonic stem cells are widely used in cell therapy procedures. Moreover, transplanted cells including induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), embryonic stem cells (ESCs), neural stem cells (NSCs), and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are divided broadly into two main groups including autologous cells and non-autologous cells. Development of precision medicine and advancements in Advanced Therapies Medicinal Products (ATMPS) in context to their efficiency and manufacturing are expected to be the major drivers for the market. Furthermore, automation in adult stem cells and cord blood processing and storage are the key technological advancements that fuel growth of the market for cell therapy. In addition, growth in aging patient population, The rise in cell therapy transplantations globally, and surge in disease awareness drive growth of the global cell therapy market. Furthermore, The rise in adoption of human cells over animal cells for cell therapeutics research, technological advancements in field of cell therapy, and increase in incidences of diseases such as cancer, cardiac abnormalities, and organ failure are the key factors that drive growth of the global market. Moreover, implementation of stringent government regulations regarding the use of cell therapy is anticipated to restrict growth of the market. On the contrary, surge in number of regulations to promote stem cell therapy and increase in funds for research in developing countries are expected to offer lucrative opportunities to the market in the future. The global cell therapy market is categorized on the basis of therapy type, therapeutic area, cell type, end user, and region. On the basis of therapy type, the market is segregated into autologous and allogenic. By therapeutics, it is classified into malignancies, musculoskeletal disorders, autoimmune disorders, dermatology, and others. Key BenefitsThe study provides an in-depth analysis of the global cell therapy market along with the current trends and future estimations to elucidate the imminent investment pockets.Comprehensive analysis of factors that drive and restrict the market growth is provided in the report.Comprehensive quantitative analysis of the industry from 2019 to 2027 is provided to enable the stakeholders to capitalize on the prevailing market opportunities.Extensive analysis of the key segments of the industry helps in understanding the forms and types of cell therapy used across the globe.Key market players and their strategies have been analyzed to understand the competitive outlook of the market. Market Dynamics DriversTechnological Advancements in the Field of Cell TherapyThe Rise in Number of Cell Therapy Clinical StudiesThe Rise in Adoption of Regenerative Medicine RestraintDeveloping Stage and Pricing OpportunityHigh Growth Potential in Emerging Markets Companies ProfiledAllosourceCells for CellsHolostem Terapie Avanzate SrlJcr Pharmaceuticals Co. Ltd.Kolon Tissuegene, Inc.Medipost Co. Ltd.Mesoblast LtdNuvasive, Inc.Osiris Therapeutics, Inc.Stemedica Cell Technologies, Inc. For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/qwjn6g View source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210208005698/en/ CONTACT: ResearchAndMarkets.com Laura Wood, Senior Press Manager [email protected] For E.S.T Office Hours Call 1-917-300-0470 For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call 1-800-526-8630 For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900 KEYWORD: INDUSTRY KEYWORD: HEALTH GENERAL HEALTH SOURCE: Research and Markets Copyright Business Wire 2021. PUB: 02/08/2021 12:53 PM/DISC: 02/08/2021 12:53 PM http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210208005698/en Twittercenter_img Global Cell Therapy Market (2020 to 2027) – by Cell Type, Therapy Type, Therapeutic Area, and End-user – ResearchAndMarkets.com Local NewsBusiness Pinterest Facebook WhatsApp Previous articleKami Hoss, DDS of The Super Dentists Launches Super Toothbrushes for Kids – Infants to TeensNext articleTrump’s 2nd trial to start with fight over its legitimacy Digital AIM Web Supportlast_img read more

Gardai and council issue road warnings

first_img Pinterest Twitter By News Highland – December 4, 2010 WhatsApp Gardai and council issue road warnings Facebook Pinterest Twitter Gardai are advising people to continue to exercise extreme caution on the roads, with black ice now a major problem.Motorists are asked not to make unnecessary journeys, and gardai say people should use public transport where possible.Gardai are urging drivers to be conscious of the safety of pedestrians, and they’re urging pedestrians to avoid walking on the road and wear hi-vis jackets.Current indications are that temperatures are to remain very low and drop further later on and this will create further difficult driving conditions.Numerous collisions and incidents were reported in Donegal this morning, as widespread black iceled to the most dangerous driving conditions yet in the county. Three gritters went off the road in West Donegal, an indication of the seriousness of the situation.The council says it began gritting at 6am, but it rained and froze over, and the county’s roads were like ice rinks.The council will delay gritting until 8am tomorrow (Sun), but says motorists cannot take it as read that treated roads will be safe.Senior Council Roads Engineer Michael Mc Garvey says salt and grit supplies are being managed, but they have to be mixed, and that is compromising their effectiveness in places. He says the changed conditions are very serious……[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/michsat.mp3[/podcast] Previous articleInquest finds Letterkenny 8 year old died of an undiagnosed heart conditionNext articleRoads treacherous again tonight (Sunday) News Highland Facebook Dail hears questions over design, funding and operation of Mica redress scheme center_img Google+ 70% of Cllrs nationwide threatened, harassed and intimidated over past 3 years – Report RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Minister McConalogue says he is working to improve fishing quota Newsx Adverts Need for issues with Mica redress scheme to be addressed raised in Seanad also Google+ Almost 10,000 appointments cancelled in Saolta Hospital Group this week Man arrested in Derry on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences releasedlast_img read more

Garda appeal after homes are robbed in Lifford, Raphoe and Carrigans

first_img Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North WhatsApp Garda appeal after homes are robbed in Lifford, Raphoe and Carrigans Twitter Google+ Gardai are appealing for help from the public in relation to a spate of break-ins in the Lifford, Raphoe and Carrigans area over the weekend.Three houses, which were vacant at the time, were targeted between 11.30am and 1pm on Sunday. A significant amount of jewelry was taken.At least two men in a green coloured car approached a fourth house, but left when they realised its owners were home.Gardai are asking anyone who may have seen the green car in the area to contact them in Letterkenny or Lifford. Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Facebook By News Highland – April 24, 2012 Twitter Pinterestcenter_img Facebook Google+ Previous articleTyrone priest Fr Eugene Boland in court on assault chargesNext articleTwo arrests in Strabane as investigation continues into Carlton Drive shooting News Highland Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Newsx Adverts Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th Pinterest WhatsApplast_img read more

Grant to fund new lighting

first_img Book Nook to reopen Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Print Article Published 7:52 am Friday, October 14, 2011 By The Penny Hoarder Latest Stories By Jaine Treadwell Around the WebDoctor: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Health VideosIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthTop 4 Methods to Get Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel The City of Brundidge received notice Thursday from Governor Robert Bentley that the city has been approved for a grant through the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs in the amount of $69,950 for the purchase and installation of advanced lighting retrofits for street lighting.The City will match $11,531.00 in contractual services and personnel work force. The total funding for the project will be $81,031.Britt Thomas, Brundidge city manager, said the grant funds will be used to install LED lights on S.A. Graham Boulevard and extend the LED lighting to the end of North Main and South Main streets. Brundidge was among the first cities in the country to install LED street lights.“Prior to that, most of the LED lights had been installed in parking lots,” Thomas said. “We are just beginning to see the more expensive LED lights replacing the conventional lights.” Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Grant to fund new lighting Skip Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies Are… Sponsored Content You Might Like Hunt Familiy to perform The Hunt Family Fiddlers will perform on Monday. The Hunt Family Fiddlers are coming to the Claudia Crosby Theater on… read more Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration “S.A. Graham Boulevard has no LED street lights and they are needed because that street is a gateway into downtown, ” Thomas said. “In the spring of 2010, the city received a similar grant (stimulus money) to install LED street lights in the downtown area and along sections of North and South Main. This grant will allow us to extend the LED street lights north to the city cemetery and south to beyond Green’s Antiques.”Thomas said the LED street lights conserve energy and will save the city about $12,300 in wholesale power costs annually.“LED lights are expense,” Thomas said. “A conventional bulb for conventional street lights is about $150. A LED bulb is between $600 and $700. But, according to the manufacturer, an LED bulb is rated for a 22-year life. So, not only is that a savings to the city, it also saves on maintenance.” Thomas said that, without additional grant funding, other LED street light projects in the city would not be likely. Email the authorlast_img read more

Teams, organizers prepping for 2014 Relay

first_img You Might Like ‘Happy Birthday’ teen event also has Troy connection Craig Huffman, who has roots in Troy, will be interviewed on CNN’s documentary, “Happy Birthday, Mrs. Obama” at 9 p.m…. read more Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthMost 10 Rarest Skins for FortniteTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Book Nook to reopen Email the author The Pike County American Cancer Society Board has a variety of activities planned for the 2014 campaign to raise funds to assist cancer patients and promote cancer research.Tammy Calhoun, a cancer survivor, is serving as the chair of this year’s Relay for Life fundraising campaign.As the American Cancer Society Relay for Life Specialist, Joy Brigham will oversee the work being done in Pike County. Kimbrough said the work being done by the American Cancer Society is saving the lives of many and improving the quality of life for many others.The Pike County Cancer Society Board encourages everyone to get involved and support the efforts of the American Cancer Society to win the fight against cancer. By Jaine Treadwell Published 11:00 pm Tuesday, January 14, 2014 Print Article Teams, organizers prepping for 2014 Relay Board Member James Kimbrough said that the culminating event of the 2014 Relay for Life campaign is scheduled for May 2, at the Troy Sportsplex.The theme for this year’s Pike County Relay for Life campaign is “Twenty Years of Miracles and Memories.”“The Pike County Relay for Life campaign is celebrating 20 years of service this year,” Kimbrough said. “The goal is to raise $110,000 through sponsorship teams. Those teams include businesses, schools, churches and community organizations.” Kimbrough said that four team meetings have been scheduled, Jan. 16, Feb. 13, March 13 and April 17. Each meeting begins at 5:30 p.m. at Momma Goldberg’s Deli on the Square in downtown Troy.“We encourage all of those who would like to organize a team to call Joy Brigham at 334-790-0372,” Kimbrough said. “The money raised last year by the Pike County Relay for Life campaign was used to support cancer research and to provide information for 57 cancer patients, free lodging at the Hope Lodge in Birmingham for five patients, transportation for treatments for four patients, wigs for three patients and financial assistance for four patients.” Sponsored Content Skip Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits By The Penny Hoarder Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Latest Storieslast_img read more