Compco’s Camden and W1 refurbs

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DTZ firms up Euro network

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Mersey mission

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Swedish institutionals take dim view of Volkswagen’s Scania bid

first_imgAnd a statement from Swedish pension company AMF, which along with AMF Funds owns 0.7% of Scania, said: “Our mission is to ensure good long-term returns for our clients.“Therefore, it is particularly important not to make a decision based only on short-term key performance indicators for 2014 or 2015, but also take Scania’s long-term potential in consideration.“We will not sell any shares until our assessment is completed.”The two institutions have teamed up with the Fourth Swedish National Pension Fund (AP4) and Swedbank Robur to highlight governance concerns at Scania.Under the Swedish A and B share system, VW’s share ownership equates to 89.2% of voting power.The group of investors claims VW used its influence to remove Scania’s nomination committee, reducing smaller shareholders’ influence within the company.Furthermore, they say VW’s ownership of rival truck manufacturer MAN Group, based in Germany, presents a potential conflict of interest.VW intends to merge Scania into the VW group and says this would result in annual savings of €650m through synergies, although this would only be achieved over the next 10-15 years.Meanwhile, Scania said it has set up an independent committee to evaluate the offer. Minority institutional investors in Scania, the Swedish heavy vehicles manufacturer, appear reluctant to accept a takeover bid from Volkswagen (VW), which already owns 62.6% of the group’s share capital.VW first invested in Scania in 2000.On 21 February, it announced the offer for a cash consideration of SEK200 (€22) a share, which it said represents a premium of more than 50% on the share price.But a spokesman for Skandia, one of the largest minority shareholders, told IPE the insurer was “negative” to the offer.last_img read more

Top news of the week July 2-7

first_imgIchthys LNG onshore plant (Image courtesy of Inpex)Ichthys LNG project hit by new delayThe Inpex-led Ichthys LNG project in Western Australia has been hit with a new delay, with gas production from the Ichthys field still not online.World’s first “Sayaringo STaGE” LNG carrier deliveredThe world’s first “Sayaringo STaGE” next generation liquefied natural gas carrier, Diamond Gas Orchid has been delivered to Diamond LNG Shipping, a joint venture between Japan’s Mitsubishi and NYK.Taiwan’s CPC signs LNG-deal with CheniereTaiwan’s CPC Corporation signed a heads of agreement with the Houston-based Cheniere for the delivery of 2 million tons of LNG per year.Fluxys bumps Dunkirk LNG terminal stake as EDF, Total divest Fluxys with consortium partners has agreed to jointly acquire from EDF and Total a 35.76 percent stake in Dunkerque LNG, owner of the liquefied natural gas terminal in Dunkirk.JERA, EDF in LNG optimization and trading JVJapan’s LNG importing giant JERA signed a binding agreement with EDF Trading to form an LNG optimization and trading joint venture. LNG World News Stafflast_img read more

HHLA’s sustainability strategy on track with new battery-powered AGVs

first_imgHHLA compensates for CO2 emissions that are still being generated through emissions reduction certificates, thereby supporting environmentally friendly projects. The goal is to constantly reduce the need to compensate, which will be driven forward through the expansion of the battery-powered AGV fleet. Due to its high degree of automation and electrification, the CTA is now the world’s first container handling facility to be certified climate-neutral, according to HHLA. Terminal processes that still produce CO2 emissions today will be gradually electrified, or their transition to electrical power will be field-tested. With the expansion of climate-friendly energy supply at CTA, HHLA said it is ensuring the continued operation of its growing battery-powered AGV fleet. Half of the vehicles employed are already powered by lithium-ion batteries and by the end of the year, sixteen more of these environmentally friendly AGVs will be added to the fleet. Posted: 9 months ago Six new charging stations will be installed at CTA by the end of the year. Image by HHLA By the end of 2022, all of the almost 100 vehicles should be powered by lithium-ion batteries. This will result in an annual reduction in emissions of approximately 15,500 tonnes of CO₂ and around 118 tonnes of nitrogen oxide because the electric AGVs do not generate any local CO₂, nitrogen oxide or fine particulate matter emissions. Posted: 9 months ago As explained, the battery-powered vehicles are also attractive from an economic standpoint because their ratio of energy consumed to actual power output is three times higher than that of diesel AGVs. Further advantages of lithium-ion batteries include their charging time, which is just one and a half hours, high durability and freedom from maintenance. Six further green energy charging stations for battery-powered automated container transporters (AGV) and sixteen additional lithium-ion AGVs will be put into operation at the HHLA Container Terminal Altenwerder (CTA) by the end of the year. Business & Finance The conversion of the AGV fleet at CTA, supported by Hamburg’s Ministry for Environment, Climate, Energy and Agriculture with support from the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) as part of the “Energiewende in Unternehmen” subsidy programme, is said to be an important component of HHLA’s sustainability strategy. Specifically, the goal is to halve CO2 emissions by 2030 and achieve climate neutrality across the group by 2040. Two new charging stations were delivered to CTA on 4 September. They will be used to supply green energy to the automated AGV fleet in charge of transporting containers between the quayside and the container storage blocks at CTA. Another four charging units, each stored in a 20-foot container, will be delivered to the terminal in the coming weeks. This will increase the number of charging stations at CTA to thirteen by the end of 2020, and five more will be added next year. HHLA Aims to Become Carbon Neutral by 2040 Germany’s terminal operator Hamburger Hafen und Logistik AG (HHLA) continues to implement its sustainability strategy at the company’s terminal facilities in Hamburg. Categories:last_img read more

Little outrage at Bible-In-Schools (probably because protestors got their facts wrong!)

first_imgActivists opposed to religious teaching distribute pamphlets at Christchurch schoolStuff co.nz 27 September 2017Family First Comment: The Secular Education Network gets caught telling porkies – (but that’s not a ‘sin’ when you’re secular, is it? )“Jacob said the Connect booklets, produced by Australian company Christian Education Publications, taught children to use their pocket money to buy bibles, encouraged keeping secrets and said sinning would lead to death.CEC spokeswoman Tracey Kirkley said allegations made by SEN were inaccurate. “[They] are not at all consistent with how Religious Education is actually delivered in schools,” Kirkley said. She said the Connect curriculum was replaced by “Life Choices”, a Kiwi-written religious booklet programme, about eight years ago.”OOOPS!!!!A group wanting religious education in public schools eradicated have started to spread their message in Christchurch.The Churches Education Commission (CEC) said SEN’s claims were “not at all consistent” with current Religious Education programmes. The content they were protesting stopped being taught in New Zealand schools about eight years ago.Jacob said the Connect booklets, produced by Australian company Christian Education Publications, taught children to use their pocket money to buy bibles, encouraged keeping secrets and said sinning would lead to death.“That’s a pretty horrendous message to tell young children,” Jacob said.Their nationwide campaign aimed to reach out to parents and help them make informed decisions about their children’s exposure to Christian-focused teaching.“We do have a case before the Humans Rights Review Tribunal, and whether that gets bumped up to the High Court, we will have to wait and see.”CEC spokeswoman Tracey Kirkley said allegations made by SEN were inaccurate.“[They] are not at all consistent with how Religious Education is actually delivered in schools,” Kirkley said.She said the Connect curriculum was replaced by “Life Choices”, a Kiwi-written religious booklet programme, about eight years ago.“[Connect] didn’t fit the NZ school environment or our values of how we want things taught,” she said.Life Choices was used in 600 schools and Kirkley was unaware of any Connect booklets still used.“I don’t know even know where you could find them.”Mezy Sadat, whose daughter attends Wharenui School, said she was “comfortable” with Christian-based religious education.“I am Muslim myself, I practise my religion and I am OK with it,” Sadat said.“The more you learn the better. I don’t mean that [my daughter] should go and change her religion, but I’m comfortable for her to learn, it’s fine.”READ MORE: https://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/news/97318360/activists-opposed-to-religious-teaching-distribute-pamphlets-at-christchurch-schoolKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

Indiana selected for Breakfast in the Classroom program

first_imgINDIANAPOLIS – Indiana has been selected to participate in Breakfast in the Classroom to provide much-needed healthy and nutritious morning meals to local students and help increase participation of the federally funded School Breakfast Program.Indiana school districts can now apply for grant funds from Partners for Breakfast in the Classroom.Districts will be selected based on the number of students who qualify for free- or reduced-priced meals, average daily participation in the school breakfast program and district- and school-level support.“Breakfast in the Classroom is a great opportunity for school districts to not only help eliminate hunger by infusing nutrition into students’ daily diets, but build a classroom community by starting the day with a meal together,” said Teresa Meredith, president, Indiana State Teachers Association.last_img read more

State Road 250 closure planned in Jefferson County

first_imgJefferson County, In. — The Indiana Department of Transportation will close State Road 250 next Tuesday, August 7, for up to 90 days between U.S. 421 and State Road 62 in Monroe Township of Jefferson County.  Specialty crews have been contracted to stabilize an eroding embankment 10.7 miles west of the Switzerland County line on State Road 250 just north of the S.R. 62 “Y”.A state highway detour routes motorists around the site via U.S. 421 and State Road 62.Geostablization International, INDOT’s slide mitigation contractor, will embed 20-foot-long steel shafts into the slide area which measures 900 feet side-to-side and eight to 11 feet in height.  Ends of these “soil nails” will be fitted with a wire mesh, then overcoated with shotcrete to form a stabilizing wall.  The $1 million project also calls for pavement replacement and installation of curbs and gutters.State Road 250 at the slide site has a traffic count of 780 vehicles per day.last_img read more

Dougherty: Syracuse’s offensive success currently lies out of Hunt’s reach

first_imgEditor’s note: This column was in response to the question: Can this Syracuse offense be above average in the Atlantic Coast Conference with Terrel Hunt at the helm? This column answers “no,” click here for the column that answers “yes.”There’s a lot that Terrel Hunt can do. He’s throwing the ball with improved accuracy, creates and extends plays with his legs and, despite two straight losses and persisting red-zone inefficiency, has been marginally effective for Syracuse.But Hunt’s not a miracle worker. And since he can’t get Ashton Broyld, Brisly Estime and Ivan Foy on the field for Friday’s game against Louisville (4-1, 2-1 Atlantic Coast) at 7 p.m., he doesn’t have the sharpness — or offensive line, running game and receiving options — to put Syracuse’s (2-2) attack in the top tier of ACC offenses. Syracuse is currently fourth in the conference in yards per game at 450.5. But the Orange has the 13th-best offense, out of 14 ACC teams, in points per game, and Hunt doesn’t have the weapons to make it anything more than a shell of its statistical self. AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“When you take a step back and look at where (Hunt) is now compared to where we were last year at this time, he’s light-years ahead,” said George McDonald, SU’s offensive coordinator. “So it’s never as good as you want it, but our job is to keep building on the positives and kind of keep trying to eliminate the negative things that we’re doing right now.”Syracuse’s offense is easier to defend than it was a month ago, which puts Hunt’s “negative things” under a microscope. Ben Lewis is the only Orange receiver to have multiple receptions in all four games this season, starting punter Riley Dixon led the team in rushing against Notre Dame and Foy’s lower-body injury puts an inexperienced Michael Lasker on the offensive line.The Fighting Irish’s defense, a tough barometer for a developing attack, showed how the injuries cause a ripple effect. Notre Dame pushed up its corners on the Orange’s wideouts, took away the edge with its outside linebackers and left a light front to defend the ground game. And the light front was successful — SU head coach Scott Shafer said his line didn’t hold its blocks long enough — as no other rusher but Dixon gained more than 29 yards. That forced Hunt to live in the air, but long completions were followed by unexecuted screens and the rushing attack provided few wrinkles in the Orange’s zone-read scheme.Syracuse’s first four play-action passes against the Fighting Irish went like this: incomplete, 3-yard gain, 5-yard loss on a sack, 1-yard gain. By the fourth quarter, the Orange was down and threw 17 times while running just once, a 7-yard scramble by Hunt that resulted in SU’s only touchdown. Three big gains of 46, 19 and 16 were attractive, but none of the 15 other throws went for more than 6 yards. “Sometimes the chips don’t fall your way,” Hunt said of the passing game’s inconsistency against Notre Dame. While the UND defense is top-notch, Louisville’s — as well as others on SU’s conference slate — is just as capable of handcuffing Hunt.Louisville heads into Friday’s game with the country’s best run defense, holding opponents to 58.2 rushing yards per game, 1.95 yards per carry and just one rushing touchdown on the year. Again, Hunt will be tested in the air because the Cardinals’ front will handle SU’s. When he has time to throw, he’ll look to Jarrod West, Adrian Flemming, Steve Ishmael and Lewis — with the last three heading into the game with a combined 46 collegiate games played and 23 collegiate receptions. Hunt accepts that the offense is a reflection of him, even if it really isn’t. “As a quarterback, you’re supposed to take the blame. You get the glory when you win, you take the blame when you lose. That’s how it goes,” Hunt said on Tuesday. “Most of the time I like taking the blame because it doesn’t make my players think they didn’t do well or it kind of takes the attention off of them, the bad attention.”And in a way he’s right. A good carpenter never blames his tools. But he still needs a toolset to work with.Jesse Dougherty is the sports editor at The Daily Orange where his column appears occasionally. He can be reached at jcdoug01@syr.edu or on Twitter at @dougherty_jesse. Comments Published on October 3, 2014 at 12:05 am Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more